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The revolt, religious conflicts and the Golden Age

Zeist Castle

Posted by on 21 Feb 2014 in Decline of the Dutch republic, Photo Blog, The revolt, religious conflicts and the Golden Age | 0 comments

Zeist Castle

There is a little castle in the Dutch city Zeist, known as Slot Zeist (Castle Zeist). It looks more like a manor, actually, but it does have a moat. Originally built in the late middle ages, it was largely rebuilt between 1677 and 1686, by Dutch architect Jacobus Roman (1640-1716). In the 18th century, the castle and surrounding estate became the center of the Moravian Church in Holland, when the landlord invited a group of Herrnhuter Brüdergemeine to settle on the estate. Their church and cemetery are still in use. The current owner of the...

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Photo Friday: Fortification of Naarden

Posted by on 15 Jun 2012 in Holland, Photo Blog, The revolt, religious conflicts and the Golden Age | 0 comments

Photo Friday: Fortification of Naarden

In the 17th century, the medieval Dutch city Naarden was changed into a star-shaped fort, with a large moat and fortified walls. Today the moat and walls are in pristine condition and largely accessible to the public. I took the photos below while hiking around the city (outside the moat) and over the city walls (inside the moat). Especially outside of the moat hikers are rewarded with beautiful views of the moat, the fortifications, and the city...

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Church Sunday: Delfshaven

Posted by on 20 Sep 2009 in Delfshaven, My roots, Rotterdam, The revolt, religious conflicts and the Golden Age | 0 comments

Church Sunday: Delfshaven

Kerk aan de Kolk (Church at the Kolk) in Delfshaven, Rotterdam. The Kolk is the water on the foreground. The church’s claim to fame is that night in July 1620, when the Pilgrim Fathers knelt down in prayer on the quay near the church before boarding the Speedwell. The church is now known as the Pilgrim Fathers’ Church. The church’s website has more information on the history of the church (also in English). I visited Delfshaven a few years ago, and posted the photos to Trace your Dutch...

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The Pilgrim Fathers

Posted by on 25 Apr 2007 in Delfshaven, Emigration, Leiden, The revolt, religious conflicts and the Golden Age | 1 comment

The Pilgrim Fathers

One of the first – and probably the most famous – group of emigrants leaving Holland for the New World were not Dutch at all. On 22 July (new style: 1 August) 1620 the Speedwell set sail from Delfshaven to Southampton. On board was a group of English puritans, living in exile in The Netherlands, and now leaving for America. In Southampton, the Speedwell was joined by the Mayflower, and the two ships left together, with destination America. English puritans in Holland Twelve years earlier, in 1608, a group of English puritans fled...

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