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Dutch history

Photo Friday: Fortification of Naarden

Posted by on 15 Jun 2012 in Holland, Photo Blog, The revolt, religious conflicts and the Golden Age | 0 comments

Photo Friday: Fortification of Naarden

In the 17th century, the medieval Dutch city Naarden was changed into a star-shaped fort, with a large moat and fortified walls. Today the moat and walls are in pristine condition and largely accessible to the public. I took the photos below while hiking around the city (outside the moat) and over the city walls (inside the moat). Especially outside of the moat hikers are rewarded with beautiful views of the moat, the fortifications, and the city...

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Photo Friday: Binnenhof

Posted by on 30 Sep 2011 in Holland, Images of The Hague, Middle Ages, Palace, Photo Blog | 0 comments

Photo Friday: Binnenhof

The Binnenhof (litt. Inner Court) was once the court of the palace of the counts of Holland. It is dominated by the former palace of the counts, the Ridderzaal (Hall of Knights). Most buildings are in use by the Dutch government or parliament. The Ridderzaal is mostly used for official receptions by parliament, and the annual opening of parliament by the...

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Gathering dust: More atoms

Posted by on 23 Apr 2011 in KAMPEN Hendrik van 1912-1997, My roots, The modern era | 0 comments

Gathering dust: More atoms

On Saturdays I rummage through my old cabinet, pull out and dust off an item, and present it here on Roots. Today: A few items from the 1957 exhibition The Atom. Last week I showed you a photo of the Queen and my grandfather during the opening of the exhibition The Atom. I have a few more items from the same event. Not a word on the official program about the presentation of the book on the official program. I only have the photo as proof that it really happened, and the receipt above. Looking at all these documents does leave me with a few...

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Gathering dust: Atoms

Posted by on 16 Apr 2011 in KAMPEN Hendrik van 1912-1997, My roots, The modern era | 0 comments

Gathering dust: Atoms

On Saturdays I rummage through my old cabinet, pull out and dust off an item, and present it here on Roots. Today: A photo from the 1957 exhibition The Atom. On 28 June 1957, HRH Prince Bernhard opened the exhibition The Atom, in presence of his wife, HM Queen Juliana, and many other guests. The Atom was a major exhibition, highlighting the many blessings of nuclear energy. At the time, we did not know much about the risks and dangers. Highlight of the exhibition was a real, working, nuclear reactor. I found this short film about the opening...

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How long have they been there

Posted by on 18 Jan 2011 in Graveyard Photography, Graveyard Rabbit of Utrecht and Het Gooi, Middle Ages, Utrecht City | 0 comments

How long have they been there

The topic for the January 2011 edition of the Graveyard Rabbits Carnival is How long have they been there: This topic was submitted by the Association. Post a photograph of the oldest tombstone in your family collection, your local cemetery, or one you just happened to bump into in your Rabbit travels. That would be the oldest burial date! All the Rabbits will be interested in your fascinating finds. See you at the carnival. The oldest burial date I happened to bump into in my Rabbit travels? There are very old graves in the region:...

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Jacob van Rees

Posted by on 24 Aug 2010 in 19th century, Graveyard Photography, Graveyard Rabbit of Utrecht and Het Gooi, Hilversum, World wars and interbellum | 0 comments

Jacob van Rees

On the Bosdrift cemetery in Hilversum is a simple cross with the text “Jacobus van Rees 1854-1928”. Jacob van Rees, as he is known, was histology professor at the university of Amsterdam. He is now largely forgotten, but in his time was a well-known abstainer and vegetarian, who opposed vivisection and smoking, and sympathized with socialism, humanism and anarchism. In the late 19th century and early 20th century, there were many abstainers movements in The Netherlands, usually corresponding to religious and political groups...

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Gathering dust: Royal visit to Deventer

Posted by on 21 Aug 2010 in 19th century, Deventer, My roots | 0 comments

Gathering dust: Royal visit to Deventer

On Saturdays I rummage through my old cabinet, pull out and dust off an item, and present it here on Roots. Today: A souvenir of the royal visit to Deventer in 1900. On 22 August 1900, Queen Wilhelmina and her mother, Queen Emma, visited and toured the city Deventer. After the visit, a souvenir guide with large photos was published, and a copy somehow ended up gathering dust in my cabinet. I inherited this souvenir guide from my grandfather, Hendrik van Kampen, but I don’t know how it came into his posession. In 1900, the year of the...

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The cenotaph of bishop Joris van Egmond

Posted by on 18 May 2010 in Graveyard Photography, Graveyard Rabbit of Utrecht and Het Gooi, Middle Ages, Utrecht City | 0 comments

The cenotaph of bishop Joris van Egmond

The Domkerk was once the cathedral of Utrecht, but since the reformation in the 16th century it is a protestant church. Inside there are a few impressive graves and cenotaphs. Today we will have a look at the cenotaph of bishop Joris van Egmond. Joris (or George) van Egmond was born in 1504 in Egmond. He was the son of Count Jan (John) III of Egmond. Joris became bishop of Utrecht in 1534. Bishop Joris died in 1559 in St. Amand (France), where he was buried. His heart was sent to Utrecht and placed in this cenotaph. The cenotaph has the form...

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